Atina cannellino bean

The Atina cannellino bean has been a DOP [protected denomination of origin] product since 2010, and derives from the cultivation of the Phaseulus vulgaris plant, local ecotype, Cannellino di Atina. It is grown in various places in the province of Frosinone: Atina, Villa Latina, Picinisco, Casalvieri, Casalattico and Gallinaro. Its origins are lost in the mists of antiquity – indeed, this legume, for centuries the staple protein for the rural population of southern Italy, always seems to have been around in the Atina area.

The Fagiolo Cannellino di Atina DOP is sown from the end of June until mid-July, immediately after the wheat harvest, and requires abundant irrigation. Harvesting is carried out manually in late September or early October, when the green bean pods have become yellow. Tied in bunches, the plants are hung under well-ventilated open-sided roofs until the beans are fully ripe. The opaque white beans are then shelled using the ancient technique of manual threshing with two jointed wooden poles connected with leather cords, and then stored in jute sacks

The organoleptic properties of the bean derive from its unique ecotype and from the manganese-rich soil in which it is grown along the banks of the Melfa and Mollarino rivers and their tributaries. The soil composition determines the product’s distinctive characteristic: the thin integument, which makes the Atina Cannellini more tender than other beans, and in fact this is the only bean that does not need to be soaked before cooking.

Country festivals: after mid-August, CantinAtina is a festival dedicated to Cabernet di Antina DOC wine and the Fagiolo Cannellino DOP.

 

The bean has been a DOP [protected denomination of origin] product since 2010, and derives from the cultivation of the Phaseulus vulgaris plant, local ecotype, Cannellino di Atina. It is grown in various places in the province of Frosinone: Atina, Villa Latina, Picinisco, Casalvieri, Casalattico and Gallinaro. Its origins are lost in the mists of antiquity – indeed, this legume, for centuries the staple protein for the rural population of southern Italy, always seems to have been around in the Atina area.

The Fagiolo Cannellino di Atina DOP is sown from the end of June until mid-July, immediately after the wheat harvest, and requires abundant irrigation. Harvesting is carried out manually in late September or early October, when the green bean pods have become yellow. Tied in bunches, the plants are hung under well-ventilated open-sided roofs until the beans are fully ripe. The opaque white beans are then shelled using the ancient technique of manual threshing with two jointed wooden poles connected with leather cords, and then stored in jute sacks

The organoleptic properties of the bean derive from its unique ecotype and from the manganese-rich soil in which it is grown along the banks of the Melfa and Mollarino rivers and their tributaries. The soil composition determines the product’s distinctive characteristic: the thin integument, which makes the Atina Cannellini more tender than other beans, and in fact this is the only bean that does not need to be soaked before cooking.

Country festivals: after mid-August, CantinAtina is a festival dedicated to Cabernet di Antina DOC wine and the Fagiolo Cannellino DOP.

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